Urban Exploration: Centralia, PA Ghost Town Burning Underground





Urban Exploration: Centralia, PA Ghost Town Burning Underground



View: 407297
Average user rating 2525
Length seconds: 8m 50s

Rating

Did you know?

Coal is the official state mineral of Kentucky.


discussions:

About: Urban Exploration: Centralia, PA Ghost Town Burning Underground


Actually, what you're seeing here is a gargantuan fire god that roams underground in the area.




(Please, someone get this reference.)
I'm going there for my field trip
Why not just build a powerplant on top of the burning mines. The coal's already burning...might as well harness some of the heat coming off it
Accedent ????? It just spontaneously ignighted
So much coal burning and so little smoke? How come?
Can’t they just seal up the entrances and starve the fire of oxygen to put it out?
suck water from a nearby lake and empty it down those vents n kill the dam fire.
I went there about 7 months ago
Is there a video of the time capsule opening? I can't seem to find one.
I grew up and PA., and whatever is said, if you smell sulfur you don't go that hellish way. all these lands have an original name.
Is it still burning?
very educational; thumbs up
fall in a fkn. hole... I mean don't fall in a hole
Its February 1 2018, was the vault opened?
need to put a couple of geothermal power plant there and use the heat for the next 100 years instead of letting it go to waste.
THANKS for the celceus
Interesting.
I've seen this in TV
I lived in pa for 27 years n grew up hearing about centralia.
Thank you. Lot's of info included. Excellent!


Coal stock


Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction.

Languages:

Coal is primarily used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat through combustion. World coal consumption was about 7.25 billion tonnes in 2010 The price of coal increased from around $30.00 per short ton in 2000 to around $150.00 per short ton as of September 2008. In early 2015, it was trading near $56/ton.