Train Dumping Coal at the Power Plant





Train Dumping Coal at the Power Plant



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Coal is the official state mineral of Kentucky.


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About: Train Dumping Coal at the Power Plant


269 dislikes!! Why on earth!
You mean to tell me they went through all that and they couldn’t have had the train cars with the doors on the bottom that fall out?
Wow, coal does not pollute in Chana?
Flippin and Floppin
50 of those train cars worth of Thorium is all that the world needs to power ALL of its energy consumption for a year, and it's dirt cheap too:

https://youtu.be/k6BXvw6mxtw
Fuel of the future.
What happens next
They do that here in America too
In the next version, I want to see the contents being dumped by centrifugal force
Breathing in all that carbon dust with no mask=cancer
Why this is no coal dust is because Our 'Lovely' orange president snorted it to feed his rasict soul
Robert fishcher?
So this is what fishcher morrow enterprise do after Inception
Reminds me of my childhood. I used to play on a giant pile of coal that the steam plant used to heat all the buildings on the UND campus. Making me kind of nostalgic now :(
Pretty cool.
They couldn't just use cars that open up on the bottom? Overengineer much?
Seems simpler to collect endless wind and solar power somehow.
Love stuff like this!
Keep the machine running while pumping filth in the air ain’t America great!
Not one stinkin' comment about how strong that contraption is. Do you know how much three train cars weigh? A lot.
#RollingCoal lol


Coal stock


Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction.

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Coal is primarily used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat through combustion. World coal consumption was about 7.25 billion tonnes in 2010 The price of coal increased from around $30.00 per short ton in 2000 to around $150.00 per short ton as of September 2008. In early 2015, it was trading near $56/ton.