Exploring the Abandoned Kentucky Mine





Exploring the Abandoned Kentucky Mine



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Length seconds: 5m 27s

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Coal is the official state mineral of Kentucky.


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About: Exploring the Abandoned Kentucky Mine


Why is there a mine names "Kentucky" In California?
I think I know what tunnel you are talking about. As you walk up towards the Kentucky Mine, there is what appears to be a flooded mine entrance next to the road. At first glance, it looks like a spring. It's just a pool of water about 8 inches deep. Air bubbles come up from the bottom of the pool every 15 seconds or so, and topo maps show this spot as an adit. So....I think this is the flooded entrance you might've entered long ago.
Frank, this is very interesting. In August 1978 I explored the Contact Tunnel, 1540 feet long, which was part of the Kentucky Mine Group, according to the 1963 SD County Mines Report. It was flooded all the way from the portal to the end, I was prepared and brought inner tubes and paddled in. Near the end of the "tunnel" I walked (sloshed) and fell into a flooded winze. Climbed out OK but was soaked in red mud. But your video shows no flooding or winze at all.Are these seperate mines?
Interested in how productive it was.
@goldmining12345 These were all very small gold mines from the late 1800s. We enjoy documenting and recording the fast-vanishing mine history in Southern California.
Great videos. But you should wear a respirator and use some sort of air tester.
do you realize how much danger you put yourself in? but i still give it a thumbs up!
Dude you didn't take food and water and extra batteries and probably didn't tell anyone where u were did ya, u need canaries lol if they die then u know the air inside is methane


Coal stock


Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction.

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Coal is primarily used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat through combustion. World coal consumption was about 7.25 billion tonnes in 2010 The price of coal increased from around $30.00 per short ton in 2000 to around $150.00 per short ton as of September 2008. In early 2015, it was trading near $56/ton.