Exploring Abandoned Picher Oklahoma





Exploring Abandoned Picher Oklahoma



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Coal is the official state mineral of Kentucky.


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About: Exploring Abandoned Picher Oklahoma


My home town. It wasn't as bad as portrayed here. During WWll Picher supplied a LARGE portion of the lead needed. It was one of the largest towns. Following the war populations diminished due to supply and demand of lead. Present day the mines flooded causing most of the surface rust and discoloration in tar creek as noted by towns people.
Tailings (chat) blowing lead particles in yards and streets caused elevated lead ppm in developing children. Most that were affected recieved awards from the mining company/trusts for their issues. The EPA farted around sluffing hundreds of millions moving dirt around in what they called soil remediation which didn't work. The source problems (tailing piles) still existed and continued to blow lead particles into town. The buy outs began and slowly the town evacuated much more do after thr F4 but a few are hanging on and probably doing fine.
Picher was a giant play ground. I still look at it the same. I know almost every square inch of the places you videoed. Thanks for taking me back down memory lane although I visit the area some.
Thank you for showing some houses! My family is from there! My mother played on the cad piles and drank that water! She died from a rare brain disorder!
Super depressing to watch. Nice job putting the video together.
Are there any of the 2 story homes still standing?
Thanx for including the explanation at the end. Do those couches count for GeoCouching BTW?
Totally diggin that shot at 2:43! The crunch sound over those old linoleum tiles is too cool!
Awesome, thanks for the history lesson.


Coal stock


Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction.

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Coal is primarily used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat through combustion. World coal consumption was about 7.25 billion tonnes in 2010 The price of coal increased from around $30.00 per short ton in 2000 to around $150.00 per short ton as of September 2008. In early 2015, it was trading near $56/ton.