Coal Fields of North Staffordshire





Coal Fields of North Staffordshire



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Coal is the official state mineral of Kentucky.


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About: Coal Fields of North Staffordshire


My late dad worked at Victoria collery and hem heath
Revisited this video. I thought I’d list the Mines that a I have work at both working for NCB/British Coal then as a small firm who specialised in Roofbolting. So here we go: Wolstanton, Silverdale, Holditch, Hem Heath, Apedale footrail, (pit Bottom of Snyde and Chattly Whitfield), Lea Hall, Littleton, Dawmill, Coventry, Bickashaw, Piont of Ayr, Parkside, Ashfordby, Markam, Mansfield, Manson, Selby, Rutherford, Annesley, Wearmouth, East Hetton, Castlebridge, Ulan(New South Wales) Lingan, (Nova Scotia). There is a couple of names I cant remember Yorkshire Notts area.
Excellent video. An ex collier from South Wales here. Mostly worked the Small Mines but did work 6 years for the Board.
Thank you for sharing this wonderful footage. It brings back sweet memories: I visited and photographed the coalfields in South Wales, Staffordshire and Nottingham area in 1990 - sadly too late for many of the pits shown here but I witnessed at least some of them still active.
Too sad that too few people value the industrial heritage nowadays.
Harald
Very interesting stuff, love that a historic record of stuff like this is kept. I wonder if there's any footage or at least photographs of the old coal/mineral line in Blurton, the one which used to link Hem Heath and Florence when it was operational?

Sadly the bridge on Church Road was demolished along with the engineer's wash room and toilets just a week or so ago to make way for houses.
Brilliant, Started work at Silverdale 1975, I was a staff apprentice doing a 4 1/2 year sandwich Degree at North Staffs Polly. The NCB new how to educate a person. September to April at the poly, April to September working my way through the practical side. Silverdale had a very happy atmosphere, with a brilliant eclectic workforce. I was moved to Hem Heath in 1982 and had the privilege of working with some very experienced and talented officials, who continued to educate me, although I was the guy who was their boss. I realised that there was generation of very intelligent individuals, who had through necessity never had the chances I had. On his retirement I was talking to my Senior Overman as to his hopes, he had had to start work in mining when he was14, as his mother was a widow. Now he wanted to try for a fine arts degree. One of my workman asked if he could have a rest day, to go to his sons graduation, no problem, where his he graduating from, Oxford! The workforces were replete with fundamental talent, it was a privilege to have been there and have this as part of my life experience.

Of further interest, Hem Heath surface drift which was completed in 1982 was 2742 metres (1.7miles) not 1800 metres which matters when like my colleague you used to walk up the 1 in 4 grad to the surface. The working shaft at Silverdale was No 17, and restricted the output to about 680,000 tons p.a, A surface drift was driven so coal could be brought to the surface by conveyor. This was extended and two further drifts were driven under the Keele area.
crazy there's no such thing now
both my late dad's older brothers worked at silver Dale colliery and my cousin Kevin nadin was an electrician there until it closed good video thanks
This is a wonderful historic record. I worked in Northumberland and North Notts with a future in mining assured for "400 years". I am sure most ex-miners would agree that it was not the terrible job that some folks claim. The 'craic' with your fellows and the community spirit was fantastic.
Great video. We lived in Biddulph. My Dad worked at Hanley Deep then the Bull (Victoria). My Brothers worked at Whitfield and Wolstanton. Enjoyed this, thanks.
Great video, thanks for uploading. Fantastic to see Norton - I grew up overlooking the colliery in it's final years. Excellent!!
worked with some ex miners from Rugeley and Rawnesley,,,,,,,,,,hard men with a great sense of humour
underground coal is something I have never experienced.Opencast on big machines is something I have done.Cannock site the name escapes me
Very Interesting especially liked the Hem Heath Footage cheers for uploading it.
Great footage and pics - really good that you are helping preserve this history.


Coal stock


Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction.

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Coal is primarily used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat through combustion. World coal consumption was about 7.25 billion tonnes in 2010 The price of coal increased from around $30.00 per short ton in 2000 to around $150.00 per short ton as of September 2008. In early 2015, it was trading near $56/ton.