Malik Hooker Womens Jersey  6.0 Powerstroke Burnout, Drift, & Rev Limiter Abuse Compilation 🔴 (PURE SOUND ROLLING COAL)





6.0 Powerstroke Burnout, Drift, & Rev Limiter Abuse Compilation 🔴 (PURE SOUND ROLLING COAL)



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Coal is the official state mineral of Kentucky.


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About: 6.0 Powerstroke Burnout, Drift, & Rev Limiter Abuse Compilation 🔴 (PURE SOUND ROLLING COAL)


Young idiots destroying their machines and polluting the environment. I can unlock the rear brakes on my honda and burn rubber. I wouldn't do it with a 20,000 dollar truck.
Why?
i have a remote control car that can do better burnouts than a ford
are all these stock vehicles? or are they very modified? cool video
Doing a burnout on the grass is harder on a 6.0 motor than pavement shes screaming with no load..
6:23 she must drive a Cummins
Anyone that hates a 6.0 has never owned one. They are a high maintenance bitch tho.
This is what happens when us gassers get enough money to buy a diesel do lmao
No heads were harmed in this film...
And this is why 6.0 needs head gaskets lol
Tbh 6.0 and 6.4 and 7.3 can sound the same depending on how you tune it I think don’t @ me
I think Powerstrokes sound the best. But Cummins pulls the best.
6.0 best sounds
1:06 that’s a 7.3 bud..
A Chevy guy would say that .
All 6.0 sound exactly the same... killer video tho!!
I don't care what you guys say, but there is just no beating a sound if a 6.0!
Gotta love that engine sound and the turbo spool too fuckin rugged !!
they probably get 1 mpg
Nice


Coal stock


Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction.

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Coal is primarily used as a solid fuel to produce electricity and heat through combustion. World coal consumption was about 7.25 billion tonnes in 2010 The price of coal increased from around $30.00 per short ton in 2000 to around $150.00 per short ton as of September 2008. In early 2015, it was trading near $56/ton.